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Close to 50% of persons aged 65 and over experience osteoarthritis in their knees. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis and occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of bones wears down over time leading to pain, stiffness and decreased mobility. It frequently occurs in the knees and can be very painful.To help improve mobility and treat joint pain, it has been common for adults with osteoarthritis to undergo knee arthroscopy. Arthroscopy of the knee for arthritis, involves making several small cuts to insert a small camera and instruments to view the joint, trim loose cartilage and wash the joint...

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The idea that you can combat some of the worst symptoms of arthritis joint pain with simple dietary tweaks is great in theory – but there has been little or no evidence to back it up. Going online for information is confusing, with hundreds of websites promising to help us ‘beat arthritis’ but amounting to little more than fake health news. Now however, emerging scientific research is shedding light on the relationship between what we eat and how it really can affect our joint health, both now and in the future. From anti-inflammatory fruits and vegetables to immune-boosting bacteria, there...

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Contrary to the belief of some, exercise does not harm knee joints of those with, or at risk for, osteoarthritis. According to a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, it's been concluded that if anything, exercise actually is beneficial for cartilage. Alessio Bricca from the University of Southern Denmark, and her colleagues, say their analysis indicated that molecular biomarkers associated with inflammation and cartilage breakdown, were reduced with exercise. The analysis included 12 studies that looked at the influence of strengthening or aerobic exercise in 1,114 participants. All of the studies took biomarker samples at 1 to 6 months, and looked at molecular biomarkers...

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From everyday persons who suffer daily doing the simplest movements to athletes, knee pain due to cartilage damage could soon be relieved by a relatively new procedure. MACI, an acronym for Membrane-Induced Autologous Chondrocyte implantation, uses an individual's own cartilage to grow more cartilage and repair a damaged defect. Orthopedic surgeons have been doing ACI (Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation) surgeries for more than 20 years now. But MACI includes a new product, the MACI membrane, which consists of autologous cultured chondrocytes on porcine collagen membrane. The MACI membrane is manufactured by Vericel of Cambridge, Massachusetts, a leader in advanced cell therapies.Dr. C. Benjamin Ma, an orthopedic...

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For many people with a meniscal tear (a tear in the rubbery cartilage that cushions the knee), physical therapy may work as well as surgery in terms of quieting pain and returning the joint’s function, a new study suggests. Dutch researchers following more than 300 patients with a meniscal tear that wasn't severe enough to cause knee locking, found that joint function improved both with surgery and with physical therapy. “Our results confirm the findings of previous studies and justify an initial conservative approach with physical therapy in patients older than 45 years with a non-obstructive meniscal tear,” said the...

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